Mixed Herbs (50g bag)

£1.00

A mixture of rosemary, sage, parsley or marjoram. All grown at our Community Garden Site in Margate using Chemical Free growing methods.

Rosemary: Intense, fragrant aroma which is traditionally paired with lamb, chicken and game, but it’s also suited to fish and bean dishes.

Whole sprigs of rosemary can be added to pieces of meat or roasted vegetables and removed before serving. During the roasting process, rosemary leaves tend to fall from their stalk and so will need to be strained out.

To chop rosemary, strip the leaves off the woody stem and dice them very finely as they are quite tough. Similarly, crush dried rosemary before using it as the herb becomes even more brittle when dried. Rosemary can also be included in a bouquet garni.

Parsley: One of the most ubiquitous herbs in British cookery, parsley is also popular in European and Middle Eastern food. The traditional British choice is curly parsley, but flat-leaf (Continental) parsley is mostly used in recipes today. The flavour is fresh and grassy, and works well in creamy sauces, blended into salsas or pestos, and used as a garnish.

Wash, then chop the leaves either finely (for adding subtle flavour to cooked dishes) or coarsely, for dishes such as salads, for which you want more of a flavour impact. The stalks have a lot of flavour, too, so can be chopped finely and added as well – or use them for making stock.

Chives, Marjoram or Winter Savoury

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Description

A mixture of rosemary, sage, parsley or marjoram. All grown at our Community Garden Site in Margate using Chemical Free growing methods. Rosemary: Intense, fragrant aroma which is traditionally paired with lamb, chicken and game, but it’s also suited to fish and bean dishes. Whole sprigs of rosemary can be added to pieces of meat or roasted vegetables and removed before serving. During the roasting process, rosemary leaves tend to fall from their stalk and so will need to be strained out. To chop rosemary, strip the leaves off the woody stem and dice them very finely as they are quite tough. Similarly, crush dried rosemary before using it as the herb becomes even more brittle when dried. Rosemary can also be included in a bouquet garni.   Parsley: One of the most ubiquitous herbs in British cookery, parsley is also popular in European and Middle Eastern food. The traditional British choice is curly parsley, but flat-leaf (Continental) parsley is mostly used in recipes today. The flavour is fresh and grassy, and works well in creamy sauces, blended into salsas or pestos, and used as a garnish. Wash, then chop the leaves either finely (for adding subtle flavour to cooked dishes) or coarsely, for dishes such as salads, for which you want more of a flavour impact. The stalks have a lot of flavour, too, so can be chopped finely and added as well – or use them for making stock. Chives