Mon-Sat: 8.00-10.30, Sun: 8.00-4.00
Plant
Berginia Plant
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A bergenia plant, propagated at the Windmill Community Gardens in Margate using Chemical free growing processes. Bergenia is an evergreen, clump forming flowering perennial, which can grow up to 30cm high, with large oval green leaves that are tinged red in winter. clusters of bell shaped, flowers are borne on short stems in spring. Our plants are flowering now for visits from early pollinator visits to your garden. Best grown in moist but well-drained, humus-rich soil in sun or partial shade. Dislikes hot, dry conditions but will tolerate poor soil, exposed sites and shade. Prune but removing faded flower spikes, foliage may be eaten by slugs, snails, vine weevil and caterpillars.   Back to the shop
Comfrey Plant
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A comfrey plant. Propagated at the Windmill Community Gardens using Chemical free growing methods. Comfrey is the organic gardener's best friend. Its leaves are full of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium - all nutrients needed by growing plants.

Cultivation: Grow in moderately fertile, moist soil in full sun or partial shade. Can be invasive so site with care.

Propagation: Propagate by division of fleshy roots in spring. Propagate by root cuttings in early winter. Propagate by seed sown in pots in a cold frame in autumn or spring.

Pruning: Cut back after flowering to encourage neat, young foliage

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Dogwood Plant
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A dogwood plant -Cornus a hardy small, broadleaf shrub. Suitable for growing in full sun to partial shade and most soil conditions. Water during dry spells especially in the first few years. Leaving any pruning until March or April extends the time the coloured stems can be appreciated. Back to the shop
French Sorrel Plant
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A french sorrel plant - a soft herb with a lemony/bitter flavour. Back to the shop
Golden Marjoram (medium)
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A medium plant of golden marjoram - it has bright leaves and pink flowers in the summer, a soft herb perfect for salads or garnishing dishes. Marjorams are generally used fresh, unlike their close relation oregano, whose leaves are more likely to be dried and stored. Most marjorams also have a more delicate flavour. Leaves and flowering sprigs are popular in Greek and Italian meat dishes, soups, stuffings, tomato sauces and pasta, where they are best used towards the end of the cooking process. Leaves are used to flavour oil and vinegar. Where to plant and how to look after your plant Water pots regularly, but avoid overwatering or the roots may rot. Keep plants compact by trimming growth after flowers fade in summer, then give them a boost by applying a liquid fertiliser. Plants do not like to be too wet in winter, so place pots in a sheltered spot and raise onto pot feet to allow excess water to drain away. For a winter supply of leaves, lift plants in autumn, pot them up and place them in a well lit spot under cover. Cut back dead stems to the base. Back to the shop
Golden Marjoram (Small Plant)
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A small plant of golden marjoram - it has bright leaves and pink flowers in the summer, a soft herb perfect for salads or garnishing dishes. Marjorams are generally used fresh, unlike their close relation oregano, whose leaves are more likely to be dried and stored. Most marjorams also have a more delicate flavour. Leaves and flowering sprigs are popular in Greek and Italian meat dishes, soups, stuffings, tomato sauces and pasta, where they are best used towards the end of the cooking process. Leaves are used to flavour oil and vinegar. Where to plant and how to look after your plant Water pots regularly, but avoid overwatering or the roots may rot. Keep plants compact by trimming growth after flowers fade in summer, then give them a boost by applying a liquid fertiliser. Plants do not like to be too wet in winter, so place pots in a sheltered spot and raise onto pot feet to allow excess water to drain away. For a winter supply of leaves, lift plants in autumn, pot them up and place them in a well lit spot under cover. Cut back dead stems to the base. Back to the shop Back to the shop
Hebe Plant
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Hebe Plant, Propagated at the Windmill Community Gardens in Margate.

Cultivation: Grows well in poor to moderately fertile soil in sun or partials shade with protection from cold, drying winds. Tolerant of some pollution and can also be grown in a cool glasshouse in a loam-based compost with shade from hot sun

Propagation: Propagate by seed sown in containers in a cold frame as soon as ripe. Cultivars will not come true. Root semi-hardwood cuttings in late summer or autumn with added bottom heat

Suggested planting locations and garden types: Flower borders and beds Banks and Slopes Coastal Cottage & Informal Garden City & Courtyard Gardens Gravel Garden Patio & Container Plants Rock Garden

Pests: Aphids may be a problem

Diseases: A leaf spot and a downy mildew may be a problem

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Honeysuckle Plant
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A honeysuckle plant - an arching shrub. Back to the shop
Hyssop Plant
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A brightly coloured shrub. Back to the shop
Jostaberry Plant
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Jostaberry is  a cross between a blackcurrant and gooseberries.  It forms a very vigorous spineless shrub, growing up to 1.8-2m tall and a similar size across, and is self fertile so only one need be grown. The fruits are larger than a blackcurrant and are dark reddish black in colour. These are more like a gooseberry when slightly unripe, but similar to a sweetish blackcurrant when fully ripe in late July, early August.

Jostaberry bushes begin to crop well after two years, and up to 4-5kg fruit per bush is possible. Grows best in well-drained soil with lots of organic matter in full sun or partial shade. Plant from late autumn to mid-spring 1.5m apart. Prune in winter removing the oldest branches and clipping damaged or low hanging branches. Back to the shop
Lemon Balm Plant (Medium)
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A medium lemon balm plant - a lemony herb in the mint family. Back to the shop
Mint Plant (Large)
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A large mint plant. Back to the shop
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